UNICEF warns of increased risk to children of cholera, diarrhoea and malaria in flood prone areas of Nigeria

On 13 June 2017, children play in a flooded street caused by recent rains in Maiduguri, capital of Borno state in north-east Nigeria.

Each year, the countries around Lake Chad (Niger, Nigeria, Chad and Cameroon) suffer from severe flooding as part of the seasonal rains in the region in June 2017.

Many children are at increased risk of waterborne disease as the rainy season begins in crisis-affected areas around Lake Chad. The flooding and muddy roads are expected to severely limit humanitarian access to remote areas for several weeks. This reduced access comes at a time when the needs of the population are sharply increasing with ongoing displacement and overcrowding in IDP camps.

To exacerbate the risk brought by unstable weather, security concerns are significantly heightened during the month of Ramadan. There has been a sharp escalation in violence in recent weeks, including a deadly attack on Borno state capital. Security concerns are further complicating plans to preposition humanitarian supplies before the rains as the supplies could become a valuable target.

UNICEF warns that there is an increased risk for children of cholera, diarrhoea and malaria. UNICEF is particularly concerned for children living in cholera “hotspots” for both returnees as well as new arrivals in flood prone areas, as they are the most vulnerable and their needs must be immediately addressed.

Image: On 13 June 2017, children play in a flooded street caused by recent rains in Maiduguri, capital of Borno state in north-east Nigeria.
© UNICEF/UN068128/Abubakar
http://weshare.unicef.org/archive/-2AMZIFL93YRD.html

 

 


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