1000 Year Floods – Ellicott City, MD, US Experiences 2 in 2 years!

On Sunday May 27th, 2018, parts of Ellicott City, MD, USA experienced between 5.36 inches and 10.38 inches of rain in about three hours, causing flash flooding in the city.

In the storm of 2016 Ellicott City was hit by 6.5 inches of rain, causing flash flooding.

According to the Maryland Chapter of the Sierra Club, the both the environmental and economic impact will be severe,  “While we do not yet know the full impact, the 2016 flooding of Ellicott City caused County economic activity to be reduced by $67.2 million, with a resulting loss of 151 jobs and labor income reductions of $27.2 million with County government revenue losses of as much as $1.3 million. With the increase in rainfall this time, we can expect similar if not higher costs. This economic impact is on top of the significant environmental and human impacts. One person lost their life and the flood sent cars, sediment, and other pollutants into our waterways, flooded businesses and homes.”

Experts have described the storms that struck Ellicott City as “1000 year floods” which means that statistically speaking, a flood of that magnitude, or greater, has a 1 in a 1000 chance of occurring in any given year.

Ellicott City has been struck twice in 2 years. 2016 and 2018

The Sierra Club believe that,  “As a community, we must face the fact that as climate change worsens, we will see an increase in severe weather events. It will be important for our elected officials to take a serious look at how we prepare for these events. While no single storm can be attributed to climate change, we must take responsibility and own up to the fact that the actions we are taking are causing more severe weather disasters like the flood we just experienced.”


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