ACAPS Publish a New Analysis on the Impact of Cyclone Fani in India

ACAPS, (the non-profit, non-governmental independent information provider) have today published a new Analysis on the impact Cyclone Fani is having in India.

On 3 May, Cyclone Fani made landfall near Puri District, bringing heavy rain to Odisha and neighbouring states, winds reaching a maximum sustained wind speed of approximately 240 km/h, and a powerful storm surge in coastal areas. Despite a large-scale evacuation effort carried out by the Indian government, at least 42 fatalities and 160 injuries have been attributed the cyclone. Extensive damage has been reported to houses and farmland, as well as to transportation, communication, water, end electricity infrastructure, particularly in Odisha.

  • Preliminary estimates suggest that up to 10,000,000 people may be affected across more than 14,000 villages and 46 towns. Though Odisha, Andhra Pradesh, and West Bengal have all been affected, the most severe damage is concentrated in Odisha.
  • Shelter, food, livelihoods, WASH, and health needs are present in many affected areas and may persist despite active response efforts carried out by Indian authorities.
  • The cyclone’s winds and flooding have caused significant damage to transportation infrastructure. Though the Indian government is working to fix the damage, it will likely be days to weeks before access is completely restored.

Read the full report: Cyclone Fani, India

ACAPS is an independent information provider, free from the bias or vested interests of a specific enterprise, sector, or region. As independent specialists in humanitarian needs analysis and assessment, we are not affiliated to the UN or any other organisation. This helps guarantee that the ACAPS analysis is objective and evidence-based.

ACAPS was established in 2009 as a non-profit, non-governmental project with the aim of providing independent, ground-breaking humanitarian analysis to help humanitarian workers, influencers, fundraisers, and donors make better decisions.


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